Asotin County (WA) Sales Tax

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Each business in Washington needs to collect sales taxes to then pay up to the Department of Revenue. The sales taxes are added to qualifying items and services sold. The sales tax rate is made up of the sum of the State sales tax, county sales tax, city sales tax, and in some cases, there are extra special district sales rates. The maximum sales tax applicable in Asotin County, Washington reaches 8.00%. The sales tax in Washington is 6.50%. Asotin County charges an extra 1.50% sales tax rate. Some cities charge up to an additional 1.5% on the sales tax rate, hence we get the maximal result of 8.00% sales tax rate.

Asotin County Sales Tax Calculator, Washington

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When you are selling or buying, you need to know the total sales tax applicable to your transaction. Since each city and district has its own applicable sales tax rate, it is easy to get lost. For this reason, we have created an online calculator that figures all of this out for you. All that you must do is input your zip code and the price of the transaction. The calculator will apply the sales tax rate of that zip code and will give you a result. This way you do not need to look around and search on multiple sites.

Tax Rates by City in Asotin County, Washington

In the USA, each district, each city has its own applicable sales tax rate. The total sales tax rates vary from a minimum of 8.00% to a maximum of 8.00%. To learn more about what is the general applicable sales tax rate for each city in Washington, see the table below. All you must do is to look for your designated city and read the applicable sales tax rate.

City Sales Tax Rate Zip-code Population
Clarkston 8.00% 99403 15046
Asotin 8.00% 99402 1529

Alternative sales tax rate for Asotin County.

County Max Combined Tax State Tax County Tax City Tax Special Tax
King County 10.25% 0% 3.75% 0%
Spokane County 9.10% 0% 2.60% 0%
Clark County 8.50% 0% 2.00% 0%
Pierce County 10.30% 0% 3.80% 0%
Whatcom County 8.80% 0% 2.30% 0%
Yakima County 8.30% 0% 1.80% 0%
Snohomish County 10.50% 0% 4.00% 0%
Benton County 8.60% 0% 2.10% 0%
Chelan County 8.60% 0% 2.10% 0%
Grant County 8.40% 0% 1.90% 0%
Douglas County 8.30% 0% 1.20% 1.80%
Clallam County 8.80% 2.00% 2.30% 0%
Kittitas County 8.30% 1.50% 1.80% 0%
Lewis County 8.20% 0% 1.70% 0%
Adams County 8.20% 0% 1.70% 0%
Klickitat County 7.50% 0.50% 1.00% 0%
Pacific County 8.90% 0% 1.80% 0%
Columbia County 8.40% 0% 1.90% 0%
Wahkiakum County 7.60% 1.10% 0% 0%
Ferry County 8.00% 1.50% 0% 0%
Garfield County 8.00% 1.50% 0% 0%

Popular questions about sales tax in Asotin County

How to find the sales tax rate?

The sales tax varies by state, county, and city. Since each jurisdiction has its own applicable sales tax rate, it is difficult to keep track of the tax amount owed for various jurisdictions. Therefore, we have created a simple tool that makes all the necessary calculations for you. Using our free online Sales Tax Calculator will allow you to automatically figure out the sales tax amount owed. All that you must do is input the total sales amount and the zip code that you are completing the purchase. The site will list the total sales amount and the components of the sales tax. This means it will list the appropriate applicable state, county, local, and city taxes. This service is nice and simple to use.

How to calculate sales tax backwards from total?

Sometimes, people have a hard time figuring out the math behind sales taxes. This is especially true when people have the total transaction cost and the total sales tax. To figure out the sales tax percentage, we must do a bit of math, which is very simple and can be done via a phone calculator. Let’s assume that your total transaction with taxes is $106.25 and you know that the shelf price of the products purchased is $100.

The first thing that you do is subtract the cost of the goods from the total. In that case $106.25-$100=$6.25. Now you know that the sales taxes are $6.25. Then you divide the total sales tax by the shelf price of the cost of the goods bought, hence $100. So, ding the math, we have $6.25/$100 = 0.0625. We take the ratio number, and we multiply by 100%. Hence, we get : 0.00625*100%= 6.25%, which is the rate.

How much is sales tax on a car?

When you purchase a car, the laws regarding the applicable sales tax are a bit more complicated. The first factor to consider is that there is a base 6% sales tax. Let’s say that your car costs 10k. You pay 6% on that, which is $600 on sales tax. On top of this cost, you also pay fees for vehicle registration and licenses. If you complete the transaction via a dealership, then all this paperwork and its cost are factored in on the sales agreement. If you buy the car via a private seller, then it is you, the buyer that needs to process all this paperwork via the local tax office and vehicle registration office. You would be responsible for paying registration fees and the title.

States allow for trade-in allowances, and this is a fantastic way to reduce your tax bill. Instead of selling your old vehicle, and then incurring sales taxes on that transaction, you can bring your old vehicle to the dealership and do a trade-in allowance for a new car. The value of the trade-in is reduced from the sticker price of the car that your intent to purchase. Then some dealerships offer rebates, which further reduces your total sales tax.

Let’s say that you will purchase the same car as in the above example that costs 10k. Instead, this time you have an old car to do a trade-in that is valued at 2k. The dealership offers you a 1k rebate offer. In that case, your sales tax will not be charged anymore on the original price of 10k, but it will be charged on the reduced price after the rebate and the trade-in. More specifically, we will reduce from 10k, the value of the rebate (1k) and the value of the trade-in (2k), hence a total of 3k of discount. We would end up paying out-of-pocket 7k. The applicable sales tax on a 7k car is $7000*6%= $420. We can see that we are paying a lower sales tax compared to the previous tax of $600. We are not paying any taxes on the old car that you brought for a rebate and not paying any sales taxes on that.

How to avoid sales tax online?

Sales taxes add up and increase your costs. Everybody would like to save on costs. There are legal ways that you can use to avoid paying sales taxes. The first detail to know is a court ruling of 1992. According to the supreme court, you are not liable for sales taxes when you buy out of state. This means that if you do some research and buy from sellers that are established out of state, you will be able to avoid sales taxes.

Another great way to avoid sales taxes is to shop at eBay or other eCommerce stores where items are sold by individual sellers. We need to remember that companies that sell on these platforms are liable to charge sales taxes. The same strategy can be used to find big companies or established merchants that have their eCommerce business separate from their brick-and-mortar shops. Such is the case of Barnes&Nobles and Borders. Also making small research on how the sales tax is handled by the seller is a great way to save money, as the merchant may have special agreements with the government.

Another great way to avoid sales taxes is to purchase from states that do not incur sales taxes. If you cannot eliminate the sales tax, then why not reduce it. Since sales taxes depend on location, then choosing the right place to buy the car, will affect your sales taxes, as each county and zip code have their own applicable sales tax rate. The type of car also affects your applicable sales tax rate. A good way to reduce your sales taxes is to choose the right permanent address.

How to add sales tax?

When you make a purchase, you must pay sales tax. To find how much u, pay, all that u have to do is to add up the total percentage of applicable sales taxes to your location and multiply that by the total cost of goods. Let’s say that your total applicable sales tax rate is 8%. Let’s say that you make a purchase worth $100. You multiply $100 with 8% to get a total sales cost of $8. You then add the $8 to the original cost of goods, bringing your final transaction cost to $108.